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Werewolves, Vampires and Witches sceptically investigated by CFI UK, 18 October

Centre for Inquiry UK and Conway Hall Ethical Society present: Deborah Hyde, Jessica Monteith, and Owen Davies speaking on vampires, werewolves, and witches.
 
Register here.
 
Deborah Hyde, Jessica Monteith, and Owen Davies introduce us to the myth and the reality regarding some of the most horrific creatures imaginable. A skeptical inquiry into some of the most terrifying creatures imaginable. Come and be terrified and informed.

Note that even if you have heard e.g. Hyde on vampires before, she is talking about werewolves at this event.

Organised and chaired by Stephen Law

Date: Saturday 18 October 2014
Venue: Conway Hall (Main Hall), 25 Red Lion Square, Holborn, London, WC1R 4RL (Nr Holborn Tube)


Programme:

11.00 Jessica Monteith on Vampires. The Modern Vampire: Suave and Debonair as we've never seen him before. Vampire in film and television have evolved from the undead, pestilence ridden revenants of the medieval and rennaissance eras, into handsome playboy figures. Why has there been such a drastic re-interpretation of the vampire, and what does it say about the twenty-first century audience that this new 'modern' vampire has permeated popular culture?

12.00 Deborah Hyde on Werewolves. The werewolf is a common horror motif, but what did people during the witch-hunt of sixteenth and seventeenth century Europe really mean when they accused someone of 'lycanthropy'? A discussion including films, history and analysis, during which we will found out who is worse - man or beast. Deborah writes, lectures internationally and appears on broadcast media to discuss superstition, religion and belief in the supernatural. She is currently writing a book ‘Unnatural Predators’.

1-1.45 lunch

1.45 Owen Davies on Witches. The persecution of witches in Europe and America – after the witch trials. Professor Owen Davies, University of Hertfordshire, has written widely on the social history of witchcraft, magic, ghosts, and popular medicine. In this talk he will explore why and how thousands of people, mostly women, were abused and murdered as witches in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
2.45-3.30 Roundtable.
3.30 END.
CFI UK reserves the right to change the programme due to unforeseen circumstances.
October 18th, 2014 10:30 AM   through   3:30 PM
Conway Hall
25 Red Lion Square
London
London, WC1R 4RL
United Kingdom

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