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9 Lessons and Carols for Godless People

Tonight on BBC 4, 9.45pm. Link.

A non-religious Christmas celebration of comedy, science and music recorded live at London's Hammersmith Apollo in December 2009. Stand-up comedian and humanist Robin Ince is joined by a host of leading lights from the world of science, including Richard Dawkins, Brian Cox, Simon Singh and Ben Goldacre, as well as musicians and top comedians from Mark Steel to Shappi Khorsandi.

Full line up:
Robin Ince, Richard Dawkins, Brian Cox, Mark Steel, Richard Herring, Shappi Khorsandi, Ben Goldacre, Simon Singh, Barry Cryer and Ronnie Golden, Robyn Hitchcock, Jim Bob and Baba Brinkman.

Comments

Anonymous said…
That was a refreshing change. Though saying that, should it be? Is anyone else sceptical of the statistics often talked about regarding theists and nontheists in this country? In my social network only a very small proportion are God believers. I'd have thought, if there were more theists than nontheists, there'd be many more places of worship than there are.
Crocoduck said…
Are they going to show the full version because the DVD I saw of the show completely omitted all the main acts (Ricky Gervais, Dara O'Briain, etc). Was very disappointed...
Bobajob said…
@Crocoduck I think that the DVD was of the first performance from 2008. I haven't seen any DVDs of the 2009 show and there was no video recording of the 2010 one. I think that's why certain performers weren't on your DVD.

@Anonymous Some statistics are v. badly skewed, particularly the upcoming census which the ONS (the folks in charge of it) have already admitted will be very inaccurate on this subject. Generally speaking the UK is about 60%ish non-religious. It all depends on how the pollsters phrase the question. Plus many theists are like tory voters and pretend to be normal people when in public.

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