Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Poster idea

Any teachers out there....I need some advice.

I am thinking of producing a colourful A2 poster for schools promoting philosophy and my college. I was thinking on one side a "what is philosophy?" cartoon-type Philosophy Files thing, and on the other side a couple of discussion topics.

However, what we really need is to target the right age group and get the poster put up on walls. Have any teachers out there got any advice in terms if what would be popular with teachers and encourage them to it up?

In terms of raising awareness, we could actually aim at slightly younger kids. But is that advisable? Who would you target in the first instance?

anyway - interested in your thoughts...

BTW I did one like this a few years ago for Teacher magazine and it was quite popular, I think.

best
Stephen

8 comments:

nigel said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
nigel said...

Would the cover design of Philosophy for Teens <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Philosophy-Teens-Questioning-Lifes-Ideas/dp/1593632029/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1327469434&sr=1-5”</a> (3 books by Sharon Kaye) be helpful?

Daver said...

My wife is a teacher and I asked her about this. She came up with this:



I definitely think they should aim for a poster directed at younger children.

With younger children, connections (linking the lesson) to literature (good children's books) is super helpful. I think children in the primary grades (K- gr. 3 ... aged 5-9 years) could be easily presented with philosophy and engaged in the discussion if you start with some good children's literature that they can relate to.

Here are some examples:
Discussion questions for doing Philosophy using Children's literature:
http://depts.washington.edu/nwcenter/lessonsplansdiscussquestions.html

Another book with examples of young children exploring philosophical questions:
Dialogues with Children (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1984). This author wrote his own 'stories' that engaged children in discussion of various philosophical topics (actually, he would write the beginning of the story and then as a group the children would offer ideas for the 'ending' of the story).

For older children, topics of a more involved / serious nature such as the holocaust offer topics for philosophical discussion:
http://depts.washington.edu/nwcenter/lessonsplansholocaust.html

Maybe the direction they need to go is to develop two or three different posters, each aimed at a different age of children. The questions discussed in each poster would, of course, be age dependent.

I would maybe develop different posters for:

K - gr. 3

gr. 4-6

gr. 7-12

Perhaps on one side have the cartoon-type 'Philosophy files' but on the other side have some examples and illustrations of discussion topics (maybe a picture of the book (children's literature) in the example for younger children).

If they could include with the poster (develop along with the poster) a short 'lesson' plan (example) that would really draw teacher in as well. Teachers like to have those resources and links handy for sure.

Hope that helps!

Sandra :)

Stephen Law said...

Thanks guys this is very useful - and appreciated!

Anonymous said...

I teach Religious, Moral & Philosphical Studies at a school in Scotland and would love a poster promoting philosophy for 12-18 year olds. At the moment my S3 pupils are exploring the 'existence of God' arguments. A "what is philosophy" cartoon would be great as it is much misunderstood, but please include the existence of God as a topic!

Jack Sowter said...

I think you should ask the 3 minute philosophy guy to do it.

http://www.google.com.au/search?q=3+minute+philosophy

L said...

Contact the guy who does 3 Minute philosophy on youtube, his style seems to attract a lot of views - it's awfully funny too.

Jonticleer said...

hi Dr Law, have you produced the posters and are you already distributing them to schools? I am trying to encourage some A level RE students at a school in Southend to attend the conference you are leading in March.
Jonathan - Heythrop student.