Monday, January 4, 2010

Cheeky monkey

A naughty person has cut and pasted as their own work a chpt of my The Great Philosophers on the internet without any acknowledgement or credit or permission. What to do...?

http://hubpages.com/hub/johnlocke

12 comments:

littleshotlarry said...

I love how he says in his profile, "My writing has improved since I've joined."

You don't say?! Haha

Fergus Gallagher said...

By linking to it you might be getting him more ad revenue.

The Atheist Missionary said...

1. Demand that it be removed and give him a deadline to do so.

2. If that doesn't work, contact his server; and

3. If that doesn't work, give me a call and I will be happy to pursue the matter on a pro bono basis.

DavidMWW said...

http://hubpages.com/help/copyright_infringement

Stephen Law said...

Thanks to all - I have let publisher know, so they'll probably take care of it. If not I'll follow up that link...

Anonymous said...

Any of his other stuff yours? Like http://hubpages.com/hub/plato_theory_of_forms or http://hubpages.com/hub/thomashobbes ?

Mike said...

Stephen,
I have to run to work, so I was only able to make a cursory glance at the articles, but I can see that this guy also lifted your material on Plato, Bacon, Hobbs and James. As a person who makes his living by creating copyrighted material, this sort of thing infuriates me. The guy even makes introductory statements like, "I felt compelled to write this hub after discovering this philosopher inadvertently..." The website in question is a for-profit scheme, and this guy has stolen your work to draw traffic (i.e. revenue) to his site. Please make copies of all the relevant pages immediately and consult your lawyer.

Anonymous said...

He has made several spelling errors when transcribing ... maybe he should be sued for that too?

Dr Pauline Kiernan said...

My post earlier hasn't come up, so I'll write it again and hope this works.
I think maybe the reference to the Karamazov 'quote' could do with a little more discussion as it's been so apallingly hijacked erroneously in all kinds of fields, including humanists via Sartre.
Before you scream WORD COUNT! I really think the reference needs a bit more - just a few lines. I think the reader will be frustrated not to have more info but also you'd be doing us all a favour (not to mention Dostoevsky)!
Part of the novel's strategy is to show how dangerous irresponsible intellectualising like Ivan's can be. Dostoevsky makes Ivan say things to perniciously mislead other characters to show how evil, or at least wrongdoing, can be generated by people like Ivan playing with people's minds.
As you say, the 'quote line' is not spoken by Ivan at all. He pretends to conclude that there's no God, no morality (but later says he does believe in God - is this ambiguous?) What every reference to the 'quote' that I've come across fails to see is that Dostoevsky was a novelist - he orchestrated characters and story to make meaning of far greater complexity than a simplistic 'Does-God-exist-or-not?' soundbite. By the way, Shakespeare is the prime victim of this kind of lamentable ignorance of how fiction works which is why we have him hijacked onto pro-war waggons etc etc.

Stephen Law said...

Thanks anon. Had not spotted that.

Thanks Mike. OK it's all with the publishers. I'm sure they will kick butt.

Pauline - OK I shall follow your advice on the Ivan matter...

Ron Murphy said...

Your heading "Cheeky monkey" also directs to his page, rather than to this main post.

Stephen Law said...

I fixed that Ron. BTW someone alerted me to one of these posts ages ago and I remember leaving a comment along the lines of "please credit me" and then forgot all about it. Bit shocking to find it still there, and indeed, added to...